Tuesday, January 30, 2007

Hiragana

In Japan, you use more than one writing system, which are Katakana, Hiragana, Kanji, and Rōmaji. Although all are extremely interesting, I tend to bend more towards Hiragana. But that’s only cause I liked the writing style, and it seems to be the easiest version of writing for me to use. =3

Hiragana was from Chinese characters (which is shown in the graph below), and was originally called onnade, or “woman’s hand” as used normally by women, while men wrote in Kanji or Katakana. By the 1900’s everyone used Hiragana, and is called "ordinary syllabic script".
In each column the rōmaji appears on the left, the hiragana symbols in the middle and the kanji from which they developed on the right.




So, I found this website where you can look at the alphabet and how the different characters are written! But its not only for Japanese, it’s for many, many, many more languages out there. So take a look around and I hope you enjoy! n_n

More Japanese?

Also, get your name in Katakana!



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2 Comments:

At Jan 30, 2007, 12:29:00 PM, Blogger Meyume said...

Ah, for Meyume, you use the characters for mi, yu, and mu. =D

Or so, the translation of my name told me too. n_n
Go to the "Get your name in Katakana" first to figure it out!

 
At Jan 30, 2007, 2:11:00 PM, Anonymous Kamisori said...

I was wondering why people pronouced your name like that...

That's why I don't question anyones name anymore... too confusing...

Always thought Katakana was derived from Kanji as well...
Probably should mention that Katakana is used primarily for "borrowed" words or used for emphasizing...
Katakana and even Romaji are becoming more and more common place now.

 

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